eivind holum

Vector art & flat design

eivind holum
Vector art & flat design

About vector design

Vector editors are often contrasted with bitmap editors, and their capabilities complement each other. Vector editors are often better for page layout, typography, logos, sharp-edged artistic illustrations (e.g. cartoons, clip art, complex geometric patterns), technical illustrations, diagramming and flowcharting. Bitmap editors are more suitable for retouching, photo processing, photorealistic illustrations, collage, and illustrations drawn by hand with a pen tablet. Recent versions of bitmap editors such as GIMP and Adobe Photoshop support vector tools (e.g. editable paths), and vector editors such as Adobe Fireworks, Adobe FreeHand, Adobe Illustrator, Affinity Designer, Animatron, Artboard, Autodesk Graphic (formerly iDraw), CorelDRAW, Sketch, Inkscape, sK1 or Xara Photo & Graphic Designer have adopted raster effects that were once limited to bitmap editors (e.g. blurring).

Flat design

Flat design is a minimalist user interface (UI) design genre, or design language, commonly used in graphical user interfaces (such as web applications and mobile apps), and also in such graphical materials as posters, arts, guide documents and publishing products. Definition and purpose[edit]

Flat design is a style of interface design emphasizing minimum use of stylistic elements that give the illusion of three dimensions (such as the use of drop shadows, gradients or textures)[1] and is focused on a minimalist use of simple elements, typography and flat colors.[2] Designers may prefer flat design because it allows interface designs to be more streamlined and efficient. It is easier to quickly convey information while still looking visually appealing and approachable.[3] Additionally, it makes it easier to design an interface that is responsive to changes in browser size across different devices. With minimal design elements, websites are able to load faster and resize easily, and still look sharp on high-definition screens.[1] As a design approach, it is often contrasted to skeuomorphism[4] and rich design,[1] although flat design can use skeuomorphs just as much as a realistically designed UI.

History[edit]

iOS 7, an example of flat design.

Flat design is primarily influenced by the International Typographic Style (also known as Swiss Style), Text User Interface, Modernism, and the styles emerging from Bauhaus.[1][5][6][7] The International Typographic style is often considered the most substantial influence on flat design, and its emergence and popularization during the 1950s and 1960s is regarded as the starting point of flat design, although it would not make an appearance in the digital world for some time thereafter.[8]